• « [Chaque nouvelle de Beattie est] comme un nouveau communiqué du front : nous nous en emparons, impatients de savoir ce qui se passe là-bas, à la lisière du no man's land mouvant et aléatoire qu'on appelle les relations interpersonnelles. » Margaret Atwood
    « Personne n'avait jamais écrit comme Ann Beattie. Raymond Carver et d'autres minimalistes étaient des précurseurs, mais son oeuvre est unique. Selon John Updike, elle a "trouvé le moyen d'écrire un tout nouveau type d'histoires". » The Nation

    « Ann Beattie est un trésor national, un auteur de nouvelles qui entrera dans la postérité et continuera à inspirer. » The New York Times

    « L'un des maîtres de la nouvelle les plus décisifs et indispensables à notre époque. Beattie saisit et rend brillamment une époque, un lieu et la forme d'un engagement. Sa voix est originale et unique. » The Washington Post

    « Ses nouvelles brillamment construites, avisées et obsédantes, sont d'une drôlerie acerbe et composent un magnifique recueil. » Booklist

  • C'est le début des années 2000, dans un collège huppé du New Hampshire. Ben, Jasper et LouLou rejoignent la société d'honneur dirigée par Pierre LaVerdere, un enseignant énigmatique, brillant, mais pervers. Il leur apprend à penser et à s'exprimer ; tous s'efforcent de lui plaire. Au fil des années, l'instruction du professeur perdure dans la vie de ses étudiants. En déroute, Ben sent le rythme de sa vie adulte s'accélérer, des échecs professionnels et romantiques le poussent à reconsidérer ses relations intimes, de moins en moins épanouissantes. Et que lui a réellement enseigné la Bailey Academy ? Tandis qu'il retrouve un semblant de stabilité, la réapparition de LaVerdere dans sa vie perturbe son équilibre. Tout ce qu'il pensait savoir sur son professeur - et sur lui-même - est alors remis en question.
    Grâce à son talent de portraitiste, Ann Beattie observe l'âme humaine dans des situations extrêmes et nous entraîne dans le sillage de ses personnages attachants et tourmentés.

  • 1980. Jane, brillante diplômée de Harvard, quitte la ferme du Vermont où elle vivait avec Ben, musicien et poète en herbe, pour s'installer à New York avec Neil, un professeur écrivain beaucoup plus âgé qu'elle, qui décide de prendre en main son éducation. Ceci jusqu'au jour où elle découvre qu'il est marié et, contrairement à ce qu'il prétendait, ne passe pas ses nuits à écrire dans le cabinet de Tyler, son ami vétérinaire...
    En une centaine de pages, Ann Beattie décrit un univers complexe où règnent le doute amoureux, la passion, la volonté de survivre, l'ambition, avec une justesse et une ironie subtiles, un sens de la description qui restitue l'atmosphère new-yorkaise d'une époque révolue mais toujours vivace.
    « Beattie a "trouvé le moyen d'écrire un tout nouveau type d'histoires", selon John Updike. » The Nation

    « L'un des maîtres de la nouvelle les plus décisifs et indispensables à notre époque. Beattie saisit et rend brillamment une époque, un lieu et la forme d'un engagement. Sa voix est originale et unique.» The Washington Post

  • An unsettling novel that traces the faltering orbits of the members of one family from a hidden love triangle to the ten-year-old son whose problem may pull everyone down.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • This is the story of a love-smitten Charles; his friend Sam, the Phi Beta Kappa and former coat salesman; and Charles' mother, who spends a lot of time in the bathtub feeling depressed.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • These fifteen stories by Ann Beattie garnered universal critical acclaim on their first publication, earning Beattie the reputation as the most celebrated new voice in American fiction. Today these stories -- "A Vintage Thunderbird;" "The Lawn Party, " " La Petite Danseuse de Quatorze Ans," to name a few -- seem even more powerful, and are read and studied as classics of the short-story form. Spare and elegant, yet charged with feeling and with the tension of things their characters cannot say, they are masterly portraits of improvised lives.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • A master chronicler of our life and times." --Newsday
    "A very funny book. . . . If Jane Austen had been crossed with Oscar Wilde and re-crossed with the early Evelyn Waugh, and the result plonked down among the semi-beautiful people of late 20th-century media-fringe America . . . the outcome might have been something like this." --Margaret Atwood
    "Ferociously funny." --The Los Angeles Times
    "Beattie's new novel, her third, is a gratifying surprise. Love Always will be welcomed by the large and loyal Beattie readership, but there is much that recommends it to the previously unconverted." --Harper's Bazaar
    "Beattie's most comic--indeed her first satiric--work to date. . . . Much of the book's authenticity derives from the accretion of felt detail--a Beattie trademark. She captures 1984 Vermont with right-on references to Cyndi Lauper, Horchow catalogs, and 'pre-Cabbage Patch' Coleco." --The Christian Science Monitor

  • To her latest novel, Beattie brings the same documentary accuracy and Chekhovian wit and tenderness that have made her one of the most acclaimed portraitists of contemporary American life. Marshall Lockard, a professor at the local college, is contemplating adultery, unaware that his wife is already committing it.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Haunting and disturbingly powerful, these stories established Ann Beattie as the most celebrated new voice in American fiction and an absolute master of the short-story form. Beattie captures perfectly the profound longings that came to define an entire generation with insight, compassion, and humor.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Picturing Will, the widely acclaimed new novel by Ann Beattie, unravels the complexities of a postmodern family. There's Will, a curious five-year-old who listens to the heartbeat of a plant through his toy stethoscope; Jody, his mother, a photographer poised on the threshold of celebrity; Mel, Jody's perfect -- perhaps too perfect -- lover; and Wayne, the rather who left Will without warning and now sees his infrequent visits as a crimp in his bedhopping. Beattie shows us how these lives intersect, attract, and repel one another with dazzling shifts and moments of heartbreaking directness.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • A collection of short fiction, twelve works in all, including two never-before-published novellas. Here are disconnected marriages and uneasy reunions, nostalgic reminiscences and sudden epiphanies--a remarkable and moving collage of contemporary lives.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • The now-classic, utterly unique voice of Ann Beattie is so dry it throws off sparks, her eye endowed with the emotional equivalent of X-ray vision. Her characters are young men and women discovering what it means to be a grown-up in a country that promised them they'd stay young forever. And here, in shapely, penetrating stories, Beattie confirms why she is one of the most widely imitated -- yet surely inimitable -- literary stylists of her generation.
    In The Burning House, Beattie's characters go from dealing drugs to taking care of a bereaved friend. They watch their marriages fail not with a bang but with a wisecrack. And afterward, they may find themselves trading confidences with their spouses' new lovers. The Burning House proves that Beattie has no peer when it comes to revealing the hidden shapes of our relationships, or the depths of tenderness, grief, and anger that lie beneath the surfaces of our daily lives.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • In her latest novel, the author of Another You combines intensely realistic description and an effortless command of mood to examine the treacherous difference between love and fascination--between what we know about other people and what we think we know. Dara Falcon is someone other people think they know. Charismatic and theatrical, she has no sooner arrived in a New England town than she is wreaking havoc in the lives of her new friend Jean and her family. As Ann Beattie follows Dara's antics, she braids subplots and vibrant characters into a work that is compassionate, tartly funny, and teeming with life.

  • Thirty-six stories--eight appearing in a book for the first time and a generous selection from her earlier collections--give us Ann Beattie at stunning mid-career.
    Emotionally complex, edgy, and funny, the stories encompass a huge range of tone and feeling. The wife of a couple who have lost a child comforts her husband with an amazing act of tenderness. A man who's been shifting from place to place, always finding the same kind of people--sometimes the same people in various configurations--tries to locate himself in the universe. An intricate dance of adultery brings down a marriage. A housekeeper experiences a startling epiphany while looking into her freezer one hot summer night. The long, humorous roll of a couple's "four-night fight" finally explodes into happiness.
    Beattie has often been called the chronicler of her generation, and these stories capture perfectly the moods and actions of our world since the seventies: people on the move, living in group houses, smoking too much dope; people settling down, splitting up, coming to terms.
    Margaret Atwood said of a previous collection that "a new Beattie is almost like a fresh bulletin from the front: We snatch it up, eager to know what's happening out there on the edge of that shifting and dubious no-man's-land known as interpersonal relations." The new stories have the same power. A family secret is revealed in a strange and puzzling act that becomes understood only many years later. In an AIDS ward, certain questions take on special significance. A hostile eight-year-old and his father's live-in girlfriend move in fits and starts toward détente.
    In prose by turns laserlike and lyrical, these memorable, evocative stories authentically recall the details and feelings of their time. But the truths revealed are--as in all fiction of the first rank--timeless.

  • A Vintage Shorts “Short Story Month” Selection
    For more than forty years, Ann Beattie’s short fiction has held a mirror up to America, in stories that are ambitious, twisted, and authentic. In “Vermont,” Beattie details the life of a reconfigured family as they search for fulfillment by escaping north.
    From her debut collection Distortions, which established Ann Beattie as a fresh voice of American fiction, a prodigious master of the short-story, and which continues to influence writers to this day.
    An eBook short.

  • For the first time, the complete stories of the master chronicler of tradition and transformation in the twentieth-century South.
    Born and raised in Tennessee, Peter Taylor was the great chronicler of the American Upper South, capturing its gossip and secrets, its divided loyalties and morally complicated legacies in tales of pure-distilled brilliance. Now, for his centennial year, the Library of America and acclaimed short story writer Ann Beattie present an unprecedented two-volume edition of Taylor’s complete short fiction, all fifty-nine of the stories published in his lifetime in the order in which they were composed.
    This second volume presents thirty stories including many of his most ambitious works, among them “Dean of Men,” a monologue delivered by a middle-aged father to his long-haired son about the limits of idealism; “In the Miro District,” a parable of the Old South’s enduring persistence in the New; and “The Old Forest,” one of Taylor’s most celebrated works, the story of a young man who jeopardizes his
    impending marriage by consorting with a girl deemed beneath his station. Here too are all five of Taylor’s remarkable prose poems, stories in free verse that demonstrate that great fiction is, at its highest pitch, a line-by-line, image-by-image high-wire act. Two of the stories in this volume, “A Cheerful Disposition” and “The Megalopolitans,” are collected here for the first time.

  • For the first time, the complete stories of the master chronicler of tradition and transformation in the twentieth-century South.
    Born and raised in Tennessee, Peter Taylor was the great chronicler of the American Upper South, capturing its gossip and secrets, its divided loyalties and morally complicated legacies in tales of pure-distilled brilliance. Now, for his centennial year, the Library of America and acclaimed short story writer Ann Beattie present an unprecedented two-volume edition of Taylor’s complete short fiction, all fifty-nine of the stories published in his lifetime in the order in which they were composed.
    This first volume offers twenty-nine early masterpieces, including such classics as “A Spinster’s Tale,” “What You Hear from ’Em?,” “Venus, Cupid, Folly and Time” and “Miss Leonora When Last Seen.” As a special feature, an appendix in the first volume gathers three stories Taylor published as an undergraduate that show the early emergence of his singular style and sensibility.

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