Rebecca Stefoff

  • Profiles the remarkable man who began as a shipyard electrician and who became the leader of Poland's Solidarity trade union movement, and who eventually was elected leader of the country.

  • Le changement climatique s'est aggravé à tel point que les jeunes générations grandissent en sachant que la Terre ne sera plus habitable dans quelques décennies. Du moins plus pour tous. À cet état de la planète, une partie de la jeunesse répond par l'engagement et la lutte : le mouvement mondial qui vise à freiner le changement climatique est en marche avec, pour credo, un avenir équitable et vivable «pour tous». Naomi Klein brosse son portrait ici et là, nous informe sans relâche sur les réchauffeurs et partage ses outils politiques - parce qu'instaurer une véritable justice climatique et sociale requiert de «tout changer».

  • On March 23, 1900, Arthur John Evans and his staff began to excavate on Crete, looking for the fabled site of Knossos, where an extraordinary civilization, a precursor to classical Greece, was rumored to have existed. Almost from the first shovel stroke, artifacts began to emerge. Evans realized that here was "an extraordinary phenomenon, nothing Greek, nothing Roman. A wholly unexplored world." The Palace of Minos at Knossos recounts the exciting story of uncovering a remarkable society lost to the world for 3,500 years, from its initial discovery through its excavation to the structure we see today. Sidebars on archaeological techniques, illustrations of the sites, tables, and diagrams throughout provide a wealth of information on the Palace. The use of artifacts and other "documents" recovered from the Palace bring out the voices of the people of the past, offering clues to who they were and how they lived. The Palace of Minos at Knossos concludes with an interview with archaeologist Chris Scarre who talks about the misperceptions about Knossos and what we really know about its culture.

  • On the Origin of Species, published in 1858, transformed our view of the world and made Charles Darwin one of the most controversial figures in science. This biography begins much earlier with his long search for a profession, his five-year voyage around the world on the Beagle, and the decades-long intellectual journey he made in his study and garden. But it is for his theory about the origin of man and natural selection that he is remembered. His book threw the scientific community into a heated debate that continues today, and has made evolutionary biology one of the liveliest areas of science. This new biography looks at the person behind the controversy whose earth- shaking discoveries and ideas remain as exciting and interesting as today's headlines.

  • One of the most beloved writers of all time, Jack London is best remembered for his tales of adventure, such as White Fang and The Call of the Wild. Jack London paints a well-rounded picture of London's short, intrepid life, his prolific writings, his unusually clear and direct portrayal of people of different races, and his struggles with writing. The book includes excerpts, photographs, maps, suggestions for further reading, and a list of places to visit.
    Oxford Portraits are informative and insightful biographies of people whose lives shaped their times and continue to influence ours. Based on the most recent scholarship, they draw heavily on primary sources, including writings by and about their subjects. Each book is illustrated with a wealth of photographs, documents, memorabilia, framing the personality and achievements of its subject against the backdrop of history.

  • On March 23, 1900, Arthur John Evans and his staff began to excavate on Crete, looking for the fabled site of Knossos, where an extraordinary civilization, a precursor to classical Greece, was rumored to have existed. Almost from the first shovel stroke, artifacts began to emerge. Evans realized that here was "an extraordinary phenomenon, nothing Greek, nothing Roman. A wholly unexplored world." The Palace of Minos at Knossos recounts the exciting story of uncovering a remarkable society lost to the world for 3,500 years, from its initial discovery through its excavation to the structure we see today. Sidebars on archaeological techniques, illustrations of the sites, tables, and diagrams throughout provide a wealth of information on the Palace. The use of artifacts and other "documents" recovered from the Palace bring out the voices of the people of the past, offering clues to who they were and how they lived. The Palace of Minos at Knossos concludes with an interview with archaeologist Chris Scarre who talks about the misperceptions about Knossos and what we really know about its culture.

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