Mary Wollstonecraft

  • « J'espère que, quand on reverra la Constitution, les droits de la femme seront enfin comptés pour quelque chose et respectés comme ils doivent l'être, surtout quand il sera bien prouvé, comme cela ne peut manquer de l'être, que la raison exige que l'on fasse attention à leurs plaintes et réclame hautement justice pour une moitié de l'espèce. » Directement inspiré par la pensée des Lumières, un texte puissant et original, par une figure majeure du féminisme anglo-saxon.
    Défense des droits de la femme se présente comme une réfutation en règle des préjugés concernant les femmes et comme un vibrant plaidoyer pour leur éducation, condition de leur égalité avec les hommes et de leur indépendance ; il se termine par un appel à une profonde révolution des moeurs et de la société afin que prenne fin la condition « seconde » de celles qui ne sont toujours pas reconnues comme égales aux hommes en droits et en faits. Le choix d'extraits effectué par Martine Reid met l'accent sur ces idées principales.

  • (Book Jacket Status: Not Jacketed)The first novel of Samuel Beckett's mordant and exhilarating midcentury trilogy introduces us to Molloy, who has been mysteriously incarcerated, and who subsequently escapes to go discover the whereabouts of his mother. In the latter part of this curious masterwork, a certain Jacques Moran is deputized by anonymous authorities to search for the aforementioned Molloy. In the trilogy's second novel, Malone, who might or might not be Molloy himself, addresses us with his ruminations while in the act of dying. The third novel consists of the fragmented monologue delivered, like the monologues of the previous novels, in a mournful rhetoric that possesses the utmost splendor and beauty of what might or might not be an armless and legless creature living in an urn outside an eating house. Taken together, these three novels represent the highwater mark of the literary movement we call Modernism. Within their linguistic terrain, where stories are taken up, broken off, and taken up again. where voices rise and crumble and are resurrected, we can discern the essential lineaments of our modern condition, and encounter an awesome vision, tragic yet always compelling and always mysteriously invigorating, of consciousness trapped and struggling inside the boundaries of nature.From the Hardcover edition.

  • If ever there was a book calculated to make a man in love with its author, this appears to me to be the book.' William Godwin, the author's future husband, was not alone in admiring Letters written during a short residence in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark, Wollstonecraft's most popular book during her lifetime. Not easy to categorize, it is both an arresting travel book and a moving exploration of her personal and political selves. Wollstonecraft set out for Scandinavia just two weeks after her first suicide attempt, on a mission from the lover whose affections she doubted, to recover his silver on a ship that had gone missing. With her baby daughter and a nursemaid, she travelled across the dramatic landscape and wrote sublime descriptions of the natural world, and the events and people she encountered. What emerges most vividly is Wollstonecraft's courage and ability to look beyond her own suffering to the turmoil around her in revolutionary Europe, and a better future.

    This edition includes further material on the silver ship, Wollstonecraft's personal letters to Imlay during her trip, an extract from Godwin's memoir, and a selection of contemporary reviews.
    ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

  • If ever there was a book calculated to make a man in love with its author, this appears to me to be the book.' William Godwin, the author's future husband, was not alone in admiring Letters written during a short residence in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark, Wollstonecraft's most popular book during her lifetime. Not easy to categorize, it is both an arresting travel book and a moving exploration of her personal and political selves. Wollstonecraft set out for Scandinavia just two weeks after her first suicide attempt, on a mission from the lover whose affections she doubted, to recover his silver on a ship that had gone missing. With her baby daughter and a nursemaid, she travelled across the dramatic landscape and wrote sublime descriptions of the natural world, and the events and people she encountered. What emerges most vividly is Wollstonecraft's courage and ability to look beyond her own suffering to the turmoil around her in revolutionary Europe, and a better future.

    This edition includes further material on the silver ship, Wollstonecraft's personal letters to Imlay during her trip, an extract from Godwin's memoir, and a selection of contemporary reviews.
    ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

  • Vintage Feminism: classic feminist texts in short form WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY ZOE WILLIAMS The term feminism did not yet exist when Mary Wollstonecraft wrote this book, but it was the first great piece of feminist writing. In these pages you will find the essence of her argument - for the education of women and for an increased female contribution to society. Her work made the first ripples of what would later become the tidal wave of the women's rights movement. Rationalist but revolutionary, Wollstonecraft changed the world for women.

  • Before the concept of equality between the sexes was even conceived, Wollstonecraft wrote this book, a treatise of proto-feminism that was as powerful and original then as it is now. In it she argues with clarity and originality for the rational education of women and for an increased female contribution to society. It was a cry for justice from a woman with no power other than her pen and it put in motion a drive towards greater equality between men and women, a movement which continues to this day.

  • Throughout history, some books have changed the world. They have transformed the way we see ourselves - and each other. They have inspired debate, dissent, war and revolution. They have enlightened, outraged, provoked and comforted. They have enriched lives - and destroyed them. Now Penguin brings you the works of the great thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries whose ideas shook civilization, and helped make us who we are.

  • First published in 1792, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman was an instant success, turning its thirty-three-year-old author into a minor celebrity. A pioneering work of early feminism that extends to women the Enlightenment principle of "the rights of man," its argument remains as relevant today as it was for Woll-stonecraft's contemporaries. "Mary Wollstonecraft was not the first writer to call for women to receive a real, challenging education," writes Katha Pollitt in the new Introduction. "But she was the first to connect the education of women to the transformation of women's social position, of relations between the sexes, and even of society itself. She was the first to argue that women's intellectual equality would and should have actual consequences. The winds of change sweep through her pages." This classic work of early feminism remains as relevant and passionate today as it was for Wollstonecraft's contemporaries. This edition includes new explanatory notes.

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    Le chef d'oeuvre de Mary Shelley dans une nouvelle traduction d'Alain Morvan. Publié pour la première fois en 1818, Frankenstein ou le Prométhée moderne est considéré par beaucoup comme le premier véritable roman de science-fiction jamais écrit. Porté à l'écran à de nombreuses reprises, il connaît une nouvelle adaptation cinématographique en 2015. "C'est alors qu'à la lueur blafarde et jaunâtre de la lune qui se frayait un chemin au travers des volets, je vis cet être vil - le misérable monstre que j'avais créé. Il soulevait le rideau du lit et avait les yeux - si l'on peut les appeler ainsi - fixés sur moi. Ses mâchoires s'ouvrirent et il bredouilla quelques sons inarticulés, tandis qu'un rictus ridait ses joues. Peut-être dit-il quelque chose, mais je ne l'entendis pas. Il tendit une main comme pour me retenir, mais je m'échappai et descendis précipitamment les escaliers. Je me réfugiai dans la cour de la maison que j'habitais ; j'y demeurai le reste de la nuit, marchant de long en large dans un état d'agitation extrême, écoutant attentivement, percevant et redoutant le moindre son, comme s'il devait annoncer l'approche de ce cadavre démoniaque auquel j'avais si malheureusement donné la vie."

  • 16 juin 1816. L'orage gronde. Dans une ville cachée au milieu des arbres, sur les bords riants du lac de Genève, une petite société s'ennuie. Il y a deux poètes, Byron et Shelley, leurs compagnes, Claire et Mary, un médecin, Polidori. On se raconte d'horribles histoires, selon la mode du temps. On décide même d'en écrire. Dans la nuit, la jeune Mary - elle n'a pas encore 19 ans - ne peut dormir : elle rêve d'un hideux fantasme d'homme. Quelques jours plus tard naissent Victor Frankenstein et sa créature. Récit d'une inquiétante nouveauté, vite porté à la scène, très souvent ensuite à l'écran. Devenu si mythique que, dans l'esprit du public qui a oublié Mary Shelley, le créateur et sa créature se sont confondus.
    Traduit de l'anglais par George Cuvelier et Eugène Rocartel
    @ Disponible chez 12-21
    L'ÉDITEUR NUMÉRIQUE

    1 autre édition :

  • Un savant, Victor Frankenstein, parvient à donner vie à un être fait d'un assemblage de morceaux de cadavres. Roman fantastique paru en 1818 où apparaît la victoire sur la mort par le biais de la science. Oeuvre au programme de 5e.

  • La question du genre étant plus que jamais d'actualité, il n'est pas inutile de connaître les grandes figures qui marquèrent la naissance du féminisme. Destiné à un public français non spécialisé, ...

  • Writing in an age when the call for the rights of man had brought revolution to America and France, Mary Wollstonecraft produced her own declaration of female independence in 1792. Passionate and forthright, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman attacked the prevailing view of docile, decorative femininity, and instead laid out the principles of emancipation: an equal education for girls and boys, an end to prejudice, and for women to become defined by their profession, not their partner. Mary Wollstonecraft's work was received with a mixture of admiration and outrage - Walpole called her 'a hyena in petticoats' - yet it established her as the mother of modern feminism.

  • These three works of fiction - two by Mary Wollstonecraft, the radical author of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, and one by her daughter Mary Shelley, creator of Frankenstein - are powerfully emotive stories that combine passion with forceful feminist argument. In Mary Wollstonecraft's Mary, the heroine flees her young husband in order to nurse her dearest friend, Ann, and finds genuine love, while Maria tells of a desperate young woman who seeks consolation in the arms of another man after the loss of her child. And Mary Shelley's Matilda - suppressed for over a century - tells the story of a woman alienated from society by the incestuous passion of her father. Humane, compassionate and highly controversial, these stories demonstrate the strongly original genius of their authors.

  • This volume brings together the major political writings of Mary Wollstonecraft in the order in which they appeared in the revolutionary 1790s. It traces her passionate and indignant response to the excitement of the early days of the French Revolution and then her uneasiness at its later bloody phase. It reveals her developing understanding of women's involvement in the political and social life of the nation and her growing awareness of the relationship between politics and economics and between political institutions and the individual.

    In personal terms, the works show her struggling with a belief in the perfectibility of human nature through rational education, a doctrine that became weaker under the onslaught of her own miserable experience and the revolutionary massacres.

    Janet Todd's introduction illuminates the progress of Wollstonecraft's thought, showing that a reading of all three works allows her to emerge as a more substantial political writer than a study of The Rights of Woman alone can reveal.

  • `The last man! I may well describe that solitary being's feelings, feeling myself as the last relic of a beloved race, my companions extinct before me.' Mary Shelley, Journal (May 1824).

    Best remembered as the author of Frankenstein, Mary Shelley wrote The Last Man eight years later, on returning to England from Italy after her husband's death.

    It is the twenty-first century, and England is a republic governed by a ruling elite, one of whom, Adrian, Earl of Windsor, has introduced a Cumbrian boy to the circle. This outsider, Lionel Verney, narrates the story, a tale of complicated, tragic love, and of the gradual extermination of the human race by plague.

    The Last Man also functions as an intriguing roman --agrave--; clef, for the saintly Adrian is a monument to Percy Bysshe Shelley, and his friend Lord Raymond is a portrait of Byron. The novel offers a vision of the future that expresses a reaction against Romanticism, as Shelley demonstrates the failure of the imagination and of art to redeem her doomed characters. - ;'The last man! I may well describe that solitary being's feelings, feeling myself as the last relic of a beloved race, my companions extinct before me.' Mary Shelley, Journal (May 1824).

    Best remembered as the author of Frankenstein, Mary Shelley wrote The Last Man eight years later, on returning to England from Italy after her husband's death.

    It is the twenty-first century, and England is a republic governed by a ruling elite, one of whom, Adrian, Earl of Windsor, has introduced a Cumbrian boy to the circle. This outsider, Lionel Verney, narrates the story, a tale of complicated, tragic love, and of the gradual extermination of the human race by plague.

    The Last Man also functions as an intriguing roman --agrave--; clef, for the saintly Adrian is a monument to Percy Bysshe Shelley, and his friend Lord Raymond is a portrait of Byron. The novel offers a vision of the future that expresses a reaction against Romanticism, as Shelley demonstrates the failure of the imagination and of art to redeem her doomed characters. -

  • Shelley's suspenseful and intellectually rich gothic tale confronts some of the most important and enduring themes in all of literture--the power of human imagination, the potential hubris of science, the gulf between appearance and essence, the effects of human cruelty, the desire for revenge and the need for forgiveness, and much more.
    ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

  • `The last man! I may well describe that solitary being's feelings, feeling myself as the last relic of a beloved race, my companions extinct before me.' Mary Shelley, Journal (May 1824).

    Best remembered as the author of Frankenstein, Mary Shelley wrote The Last Man eight years later, on returning to England from Italy after her husband's death.

    It is the twenty-first century, and England is a republic governed by a ruling elite, one of whom, Adrian, Earl of Windsor, has introduced a Cumbrian boy to the circle. This outsider, Lionel Verney, narrates the story, a tale of complicated, tragic love, and of the gradual extermination of the human race by plague.

    The Last Man also functions as an intriguing roman --agrave--; clef, for the saintly Adrian is a monument to Percy Bysshe Shelley, and his friend Lord Raymond is a portrait of Byron. The novel offers a vision of the future that expresses a reaction against Romanticism, as Shelley demonstrates the failure of the imagination and of art to redeem her doomed characters. - ;'The last man! I may well describe that solitary being's feelings, feeling myself as the last relic of a beloved race, my companions extinct before me.' Mary Shelley, Journal (May 1824).

    Best remembered as the author of Frankenstein, Mary Shelley wrote The Last Man eight years later, on returning to England from Italy after her husband's death.

    It is the twenty-first century, and England is a republic governed by a ruling elite, one of whom, Adrian, Earl of Windsor, has introduced a Cumbrian boy to the circle. This outsider, Lionel Verney, narrates the story, a tale of complicated, tragic love, and of the gradual extermination of the human race by plague.

    The Last Man also functions as an intriguing roman --agrave--; clef, for the saintly Adrian is a monument to Percy Bysshe Shelley, and his friend Lord Raymond is a portrait of Byron. The novel offers a vision of the future that expresses a reaction against Romanticism, as Shelley demonstrates the failure of the imagination and of art to redeem her doomed characters. -

  • Texte intégral révisé suivi d'une biographie de Marry Wollstonecraft Shelley. Récit d'épouvante, né de la lecture de romans allemands et des conversations de Mary Shelley avec Lord Byron et Percy Bysshe Shelley, "Frankenstein" est l'histoire d'un jeune savant suisse, Victor Frankenstein, qui construit un être humain avec des morceaux de cadavres provenant de cimetières et de chambres mortuaires. Le monstre ainsi créé est vivant, intelligent et physiquement très fort, mais animé de passions animales. II est conscient de ses défauts et de ses difformités car il est rejeté par la société et renié par son créateur. Il se venge en tuant l'ami, le frère et la femme de Frankenstein, puis se réfugie loin de toute présence humaine, dans les mers de glace de l'Arctique. Le savant part à sa recherche mais il est tué par le monstre qui disparaît ensuite définitivement. "Frankenstein", premier chef-d'oeuvre du roman gothique, récit à la fois philosophique et horrifique écrit par Mary Shelley à l'âge de 19 ans, est devenu aujourd'hui un classique de l'horreur et du fantastique. Il a fait l'objet de nombreuses adaptions au cinéma. Le talent de la romancière dans l'art de donner forme à des fantaisies macabres et terrifiantes y atteint des sommets.

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